Bite-sized Anti-procrastination

Oct. 17th, 2017 07:26 pm
peaceful_sands: butterfly (Default)
[personal profile] peaceful_sands posting in [community profile] bitesizedcleaning
Little by little we get over the hurdle, past the obstacle and little by little we make a difference. We may not have the time, the energy, the power or the ability to tackle the whole, but if we examine things carefully we can find the bit that we can do, the progress that we can make - the steps that begin the journey.

In the middle of the week, we have our anti-procrastination day. It's a great opportunity to look carefully at the things we've been avoiding starting and thinking about why we aren't getting anywhere with them. There are any number of reasons and it really doesn't matter what they are, they were good reasons before, but now is our chance to reevaluate and to begin to look for a way past them. Remember - this comm is not about having to manage to complete the whole of a task in one go, it's about finding first the way to start and then the way to continue it until we can overcome it. Tasks don't have to be daunting and beyond us, because all we're looking for at any time is the next step.

Can you think of something that you'd like to begin? Something that bit by bit you could overcome? What's today's part of that task going to be (or tomorrow's if today's is the planning stage)?

this week: holy unmercenaries

Oct. 15th, 2017 06:58 am
elbren: (icon)
[personal profile] elbren
Saints Zenaida, Philonella, Hermione, and Eukhidia healed the sick regardless of their ability to pay. Zenaida and Philonella established their free clinic in a cavern with mineral springs. Zenaida specialized in pediatrics and treating mental illness, and Philonella in gynecology and distinguishing medicine from magic and astrology. Hermione and Eukhidia founded the first hospital-hostel, offering treatment and lodging to travelers and the poor.
ink outline drawing of four 1st century women

Staying on track

Oct. 13th, 2017 10:42 am
fred_mouse: drawing of mouse settling in for the night in a tin, with a bandana for a blanket (cleaning)
[personal profile] fred_mouse posting in [community profile] bitesizedcleaning
I've most of a day at home with 'no interruptions' (I'm on my own until 12:30pm, and I have to leave at 3pm), so I'm trying to make progress on a number of things. And while I'm having a low pain day so I can do quite a bit of housework, I'm having a high scatty day, and trying to focus is really hard. I'm employing a number of tricks, but would be interested in hearing more.

So the first thing is that every 'task' set is either really short and obvious ('reply to yesterday's email from J'), or has a specific time limit ('spend 20 minutes tidying up the bedroom). This means that I'm getting lots of positive reinforcement, as I've put the tasks in Habitica, and get to tick them off and get rewards frequently. Secondly, I'm putting the tasks in to the list as they come to me, and then making myself do them in order, so that I don't end up at the end of the day having done either the fun or the easy ones, and then hating on myself for having left lots of shit jobs for Saturday, which is already hell on wheels.

Those of you who are also scatty will have looked at my twenty minutes, and laughed at me, because focusing that long? Yeah, I know. I've made iTunes give me an ~20 minute play list, and each time the songs change, it triggers me to think about what the next sub-task is, or whether I'm still on the task I started on. So far, that is working well. It also means that I know what the last song in the list is, and so when it gets to that, I look at the room and work out what the most urgent thing is that I want to finish.

But before that, I'm doing lots of talking out loud, lots of specifying what's next, and lots of counting. So, for example, in the bedroom, there was a pile of wash that needed folding and putting away, and I watched myself shy away from it several times, because it was Too Big (about half a wash basket). So I made myself count each item (15) as I put it away, and that kept me from losing track.

And reminding myself of the rule that I only have two hands, so I should only be looking at at most two things to deal with at any given time, and that the goal is to have done Something, rather than specific things in each room is helping as well.

And my break times are at the computer, but I've moved everything so I have to stand up, and that means that I don't want to linger there, which means that I'm actually getting back on task, because I look at the list on the computer, and then start the music, and then go to the next thing (I've finished three so far, and typing this has been my third 'on the computer' break, having got one of my email accounts read for the last two days)

[The Book] I'm a nerd.

Oct. 12th, 2017 04:47 pm
hermionesviolin: black and white photo of Emma Watson, with text "hermionesviolin" (hermione by oatmilk)
[personal profile] hermionesviolin
So, I've been sporadically doing tiny amounts of work on The Book.

I was working on the Psalms of lament section, and I ended up re-requesting 2 books I read back in 2015 but hadn't taken notes on -- Living Through Pain: Psalms and the Search for Wholeness by Kristin M. Swenson, 2005 (for the Psalms) and The Mystery We Celebrate, the Song We Sing: A Theology of Liturgical Music by Kathleen Harmon, 2008 (for the use of music in worship).

My chapter on psalms of lament also discusses African-American spirituals (Monica Coleman has commented that when Jesus on the cross cried out, "My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?" from Psalm 22, he was singing a lament song of his people -- the Psalms were the songbook of his people, just like the spirituals were the songbook of African-American slaves) and I realized that I don't have much to work with about the usage of Psalms of lament as part of the songbook of a people like spirituals, so I ended up going through the library catalog tag on the Psalms, and I'm bummed that it's all white dudes (I've been on a pretty intent break from books by white dudes for about 2 years now), but I'm so excited to dive into these books:

Mid Week Anti Procrastination Time!

Oct. 10th, 2017 07:39 pm
peaceful_sands: butterfly (Default)
[personal profile] peaceful_sands posting in [community profile] bitesizedcleaning
Here we go, it's time for that starting bell to ring and for us to let loose on the things that will no longer be procrastinated.

So what's it going to be for you? Big or small, easy or hard, tell us all about it. Let us cheer you along, and bolster up that motivation, because while we may not be physically there with you we're out here waving pompoms and believing that you can do it!

In need of a challenge - in deference to my own fatigue levels at the moment - I'm going to say set a timer for an appropriate length of time (5/10/15 minutes) and go for it! What can you get done? Tackle a pile or a task, clean a floor or organising a drawer or just do a bit of washing up until that timer goes.

If your personal goals are higher or your energy is abounding *eyes you jealously* feel free to do multiple rounds of time setting.

Don't forget, every good deed done deserves a reward - so what's your reward going to be?

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this week: hildegard

Oct. 8th, 2017 04:04 am
elbren: (icon)
[personal profile] elbren
Hildegard of Bingen wrote hymns, plays, works of mystical theology, and medical and scientific textbooks. She had headaches and visions, which she illustrated. She founded and led monasteries of nuns, documenting their medical treatments. She made preaching tours and was widely respected for her expertise.
hildegard icon: writing in book